Friday, January 3, 2014

Dragon's Curse: Character Profile-Edmond

This is one of my 30 Days of Dragons posts in preparation for the release of my book Dragon's Curse.



King Edmond of Regone

King Ernest of Regone had two sons. The older boy, Ewan, he trained to be king after him. The younger, Edmond, became the family's champion at tournaments, always eager to compete or hunt. Edmond tended to be more compliant than his sometimes rebellious brother, and soon he gained the title of "the good son."  The brothers were near inseparable throughout their youths, but around Edmond's nineteenth birthday  tragedy struck, altering Edmond's fate and the fate of all Regone. 

The  death of the Crown Prince Ewan at the teeth of a loathed dragon shocked the citizenry of Regone. Edmond's grief turned to white hot rage and he swore vengeance against he entire race of fiery wyrms. Drawing the  knights of his father's court together, he led a crusade into the Wilderlands, seeking out dragons to slay. Over the next four years he and his entourage killed many of the beasts until an encounter with a large group of them ended in defeat. Many of Edmond's companions were killed and the prince himself was critically wounded. Upon hearing of his second son's misfortune, King Ernest's heart failed and he died shortly  thereafter. 

Having lost his brother, father, and vitality, Edmond grew grim and cold. He accepted the crown he had never prepared for and lived a life trapped in his own crippled body. Though he disliked asking for help, eventually the pain became too much to bear and he sent to the Academy of Magic and Science for a healer. 

Edmond is quietly dignified and reserved. As a child he wrestled with his own temper and impatience and his tutor often criticized him for being unable to sit still and concentrate on his studies. As a king he strives to be fair to  his subjects but would like nothing more than to abandon his post and resume his war on the dragons. 

He faces life as if it were a test or a series of tests and blames his failures and misfortunes on his own shortcomings. 

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